Trump’s health secretary resigns in travel flap

U.S. President Donald Trump’s health secretary resigned Friday, after his costly travel triggered investigations that overshadowed the administration’s agenda and angered his boss. Tom Price’s regrets and partial repayment couldn’t save his job. The Health and Human Services secretary became the first member of the president’s Cabinet to be pushed out in a turbulent young administration that has seen several high-ranking White House aides ousted. A former GOP congressman from the Atlanta suburbs, Mr. Price served less than eight months. Mr. Trump has dismissed and accepted the resignations of a…

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In D.C. rally, hundreds protest Trump’s planned cuts to education

Led by Steve Ciprani, center left, and Pavithra Nagarajan, right, hundreds of activists march toward the Education Department building in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. (Bill O’Leary / The Washington Post) Nolan, his 10-year-old son, had bragged to his friends when his mom attended the Women’s March after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, and then he had asked his dad when he could go to a march, too. So the family of four drove down Friday night to join those seeking to be heard at the “March for Public Education,” a rally and…

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After hesitation, Carson accepts Trump’s offer to head U.S. housing department

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, a rival-turned-supporter of Donald Trump, overcame his stated qualms about a lack of government experience on Monday to accept the president-elect’s nomination to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Democrats criticized the Republican president-elect’s latest pick for his incoming administration, calling Carson unqualified to take over $48-billion agency that oversees public housing. Carson, a popular writer and speaker in conservative circles, has been a close adviser to Trump since he dropped out of the 2016 Republican presidential primary contest and he is a vice…

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Trump’s criticism of Obama, Clinton as ‘co-founders’ of Islamic State called ‘false’

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s characterization of U.S. President Barack Obama and Democratic rival Hillary Clinton as “co-founders” of the Islamic State militant group drew swift rebuke on Thursday as “false” and “unhinged.” The exchange was the latest in a series of attacks from Trump in which he has sought to depict America as less safe, Democrats to blame and himself as the only one who can restore security. Democrats, in turn, have used Trump’s often hyperbolic statements to argue he is unfit to be president and lacks the temperament…

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