Coronavirus travel updates: which countries have restrictions and FCO warnings in place?

Workers wearing protective suits at Shanghai Pudong International Airport Photograph: China News Service/China News Service via Getty Images The Foreign Office (FCO) is advising UK nationals against all but essential international travel. Border closures and other travel restrictions are increasing globally. The FCO advice took effect on 17 March, for an initial period of 30 days. This article is being updated daily. It was last updated at 7.45pm (GMT), 20 March In a statement, the FCO said the advice is in response to the increasingly unpredictable situation in terms of restrictions being imposed:…

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David Stockman says coronavirus is sparking a financial crisis, warns ‘Wall Street is toast’

Main Street may be more resilient than Wall Street during the coronavirus crisis. Former Office of Management and Budget director David Stockman warns the pandemic is exposing risky speculation and shaky market fundamentals. “Wall Street is toast,” he told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Thursday. “It’s going to end as a financial crisis because the illusion that central banks always have your back and the economy would keep expanding and growing forever and ever … was complete nonsense.” Stockman, who served under President Ronald Reagan, has been forecasting an epic market…

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Jacinda Ardern reveals ‘unprecedented’ travel restrictions to combat coronavirus, all travellers to New Zealand to self-isolate

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced new restrictions requiring travellers to be quarantined for 14 days upon entry into the country in an attempt to stop the spread of coronavirus. The restrictions apply to all countries except for Pacific nations, and will come into effect at midnight on Sunday (10.00pm AEDT). It also includes any New Zealand citizens or residents returning to the country. New Zealand has six confirmed cases and no recorded deaths. Ms Ardern said these were “far-reaching and unprecedented” measures to tackle a global pandemic.…

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8 biggest misconceptions about women in technology

The biggest problem women face in the tech world is the outdated but stubborn idea that women and technology aren’t a good fit. Girls start hearing this misconception in elementary school and it doesn’t stop when women start working. Kelly Hopping, chief marketing officer of Capterra, said that many people still think women don’t really understand or care about technology. “Many of my female peers are more geeked out on technology than their male counterparts, but the assumption is that women want to be in less technical roles, like HR…

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Work from home is the bug fix for technology companies operating in India

Bengaluru/Mumbai/New Delhi: On Tuesday morning, Intel India issued an extensive email advisory to its employees in Bengaluru mentioning travel restrictions, selective home quarantine, guidance to attend large gatherings and even handling packages. Intel’s pandemic leadership team and emergency operations centre teams are monitoring the situation closely, the tech firm said in the email, adding that it has begun screening visitors, delivery people and new contingent workers arriving at all its sites. “Security personnel will now ask visitors, delivery people and new contingent workers about recent travel to areas impacted by Intel’s…

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Challenges Faced By Women In Technology

The future of AI will change everything about life. And the gender bias that’s permeated history has already reared its ugly head. The AI revolution has, until now, been shaped by men and is starting to marginalize half of the world’s most critical stakeholders: women. How can we make huge decisions that have global implications if women — half of the world’s population — are missing from the equation? The results could be catastrophic. To address this challenge of AI, we need a body of diverse leaders in Tech, led…

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Thomson Reuters halts employee travel to China and South Korea over coronavirus outbreak

Media giant Thomson Reuters has canceled non-essential business travel for its employees to mainland China, Hong Kong and South Korea over mounting fears of the deadly coronavirus outbreak, a spokesperson confirmed to CNBC. “Thomson Reuters has halted all non-essential travel to China, Hong Kong and South Korea. All other travel remains under constant review,” the spokesperson said. The parent of Reuters News joins a growing list of major corporations that are halting employee travel due to virus concerns, including Amazon, Facebook and News Corp. The company is headquartered in Ontario, Canada, and has roughly 25,800…

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Tata Motors, two group finance firms accused of antitrust violations in India: Sources

India’s competition regulator is examining allegations that Tata Motors and two finance firms of its $100 billion parent group abused their market position while selling commercial vehicles, according to three sources and legal documents seen by Reuters. The Competition Commission of India (CCI) is reviewing a complaint which alleges the country’s biggest seller of trucks dictated terms around the quantity and type of vehicles its former dealer in northern India – Varanasi Auto Sales – should stock. More than a dozen lawyers representing the three Tata companies attended a private hearing at…

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Political Correctness Threatens American Higher Education

By some measures, American higher education is in the midst of a golden age. It enjoys a worldwide reputation as the best in the world. Global rankings of universities consistently put American institutions at the top. Students from virtually every country compete to gain entry to both their undergraduate and graduate programs. Faculty often enjoy both great prestige and impressive salaries. Yet higher education in the United States has serious problems. The tuition its institutions charge students encumber many of them with career-distorting debt. For other young people, the price…

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