Ukraine finds Russian ‘soldiers’ guilty of waging war

A Ukrainian court has convicted two alleged Russian special forces soldiers of crimes including terrorism and sentenced them to 14 years in jail. The pair – Yevgeny Yerofeyev and Alexander Alexandrov – were captured in eastern Ukraine last May. Russia denies sending troops to the region and has said the men were volunteers who had left active service. A fragile ceasefire is in place in eastern Ukraine between the army and pro-Russian rebels. The court in Kiev found Yerofeyev and Alexandrov guilty of waging an “aggressive war” against Ukraine, committing…

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Government will miss ‘ambitious’ 2020 higher education widening participation targets, report finds

Sean Gallup/Getty Images The Government is on course to miss its own “ambitious” targets for widening participation in higher education (HE) by 2020, according to a recent report. Independent think tank the Social Market Foundation’s (SMF) findings in Widening Participation has also highlighted “significant differences” between institutions’ intake of pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Government has been aiming to double the proportion of pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds going into HE, and also to increase the numbers of students from BME backgrounds by 20 per cent. Despite there being some progress…

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White teachers are significantly more likely to doubt the ability of black students, study finds

White teachers have significantly less faith in their black students’ academic success when compared with black teachers, a recent study has found. Researchers in the US analysed data from an ongoing 2002 education study which followed 8,400 tenth-grade public school pupils. That survey asked two different teachers – who each taught a particular student in either maths or reading – to predict how far that one student would go in school. Concerning white students, the ratings from both teachers were revealed to be the same. However, when it came to…

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School leaders overwhelmingly opposed to Government’s academies plan, poll finds

The poll was conducted by the NUT Getty Images Only a tiny proportion of school leaders support the Government’s plan to force all schools to become academies, a new survey suggests. Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget earlier this month confirmed that every school in England would be on its way to becoming an academy by 2020 – whether local parents and teachers supported the move or not. The plans would end the century-old role local councils have played in running education in their areas, including in primary schools. Ninety-three per cent of headteachers, their…

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Teachers work more overtime than any other professionals, analysis finds

Teachers are more likely to work unpaid overtime than staff in any other industry, with some working almost 13 extra hours per week, according to research. A study of official figures from the Trades Union Congress (TUC) found that 61.4 per cent of primary school teachers worked unpaid overtime in 2014, equating to 12.9 additional hours a week. Among secondary teachers, 57.5 per cent worked unpaid overtime, with an average of 12.5 extra hours. Across all education staff, including teachers, teaching assistants, playground staff, cleaners and caretakers, 37.6 per cent worked…

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Privately educated people dominate top British jobs, damning report finds

Virtually every key profession is dominated by privately educated pupils snaffling the senior jobs Getty Images The stranglehold former public-school pupils have on the UK’s top jobs has laid bare in a hard-hitting report out today. The study, by the Sutton Trust education charity, shows that virtually every key profession is dominated by privately educated pupils snaffling the senior jobs. Their grip on power is most noticeable in the judiciary, where 74 per cent of leading judges (those in the High Court or Court of Appeal) were privately educated. As…

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Private education a ticket to Britain’s most prestigious jobs finds Sutton Trust study

A survey has found that access to prestigious jobs in the UK for people from comprehensive schools has barely improved in a generation, raising serious questions about social mobility in the country. The military, medicine, politics, civil service, journalism, business, law, music, and the film industry are over-represented by former independent school pupils. Data from the education charity the Sutton Trust has found that only a sixth of senior doctors and one in 10 leading barristers were educated at comprehensive schools. Its figures showed that 71% of the top 100…

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Privately educated people dominate top British jobs, damning report finds

The stranglehold former public-school pupils have on the UK’s top jobs has laid bare in a hard-hitting report out today. The study, by the Sutton Trust education charity, shows that virtually every key profession is dominated by privately educated pupils snaffling the senior jobs. Their grip on power is most noticeable in the judiciary, where 74 per cent of leading judges (those in the High Court or Court of Appeal) were privately educated. As a result of the research, an All-Party Parliamentary Group is to set up an inquiry into…

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Applicants Want Mix of Old and New Technology in Recruitment, Survey Finds

Now that most teenagers have access to a smartphone, they want colleges to text them — except when they don’t. Student recruitment is complicated like that, as a new national survey of college-bound students suggests. Although most respondents (57 percent) said they were willing to receive texts from colleges, some kinds of messages appealed to them more than others. The vast majority were open to time-sensitive texts about application deadlines (86 percent), responses to specific questions (82 percent), and reminders about events they had registered for (75 percent). But they…

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